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Fire prevention checklist — electrical cords and temporary wiring

Electrical cords and temporary wiring account for thousands of electrical system fires that occur each year. These fires can be prevented by limiting the use of electrical cords and temporary wiring. Regular inspection and proper maintenance when they are used will also help reduce the chance of loss. The following is a brief, not all-inclusive, checklist to evaluate fire safety related to electrical cords and temporary wiring:

Extension cords

Yes

No

N/A

Is the use of extension cords, as a substitute for fixed building wiring, prohibited?      
Are extension cords inspected for broken connectors, damaged insulation, and missing hardware before each use?      
Is the routing of extension cords, through walls, over beams, around corners, or through doorways prohibited?      
Are extension cords approved/listed for the environment present and loads expected?      
Are extension cords in wet areas equipped with ground fault circuit interruption (GFCI) devices?      
Are employees directed not to use an extension cord while it is coiled or wrapped tightly around itself?      
Is the splicing of damaged extension cords prohibited?      

Equipment power cords

Yes

No

N/A

Are power cords on equipment limited to a maximum length of 3 feet (0.9 m)?      
Is the splicing of equipment cords, to repair damage or to extend its original length, prohibited?      
Are equipment cords inspected for damage, including the condition of any strain relief devices, before each use?      
Is the use of equipment cords without a ground connection, unless it is listed as “double-insulated,” prohibited?      

Temporary wiring

Yes

No

N/A

Is temporary wiring used only when needed, such as for construction, maintenance, repair, or demolition activities?      
Is the use of temporary wiring for holiday displays, special occasions, and ornamental lighting limited to no more than 90 days?      
When used, is temporary wiring located at least 7 feet (2.1 m) above any walking or working surface and not routed through doors, floors, or walls?      
Are only grounding-type receptacles used to provide power to temporary wiring?      

 


Copyright ©2016, ISO Services, Inc.

This material is provided for informational purposes only and does not provide any coverage or guarantee loss prevention. The examples in this material are provided as hypothetical and for illustration purposes only. The Hanover Insurance Company and its affiliates and subsidiaries (“The Hanover”) specifically disclaim any warranty or representation that acceptance of any recommendations contained herein will make any premises, or operation safe or in compliance with any law or regulation. By providing this information to you, The Hanover does not assume (and specifically disclaims) any duty, undertaking or responsibility to you. The decision to accept or implement any recommendation(s) or advice contained in this material must be made by you.

LC FEB 2019-146
171-1193 (12/18)